Lightning Map Courtesy of Blitzortung.org hobbyist lightning detection network.
Data supplied by Blitzortung network members using their home-built Blitzortung hardware.

The Blitzortung networks members build (from kit parts) the detector which monitors H-field (and now can do E-field) emissions from lightning strikes, and has a set of servers in Europe to correlate the Time-Of-Arrival at detectors v.s. GPS-time and uses that to locate strikes. There is a great (and somewhat hypnotic) realtime map for North America where you can see real-time strike info, and which stations participated in the location of that strike. There is a companion site that offers the same data and uses a zoomable Leaflet Map for display.

LIGHTNING Detector (Lightning Radar since it detects RADIO waves of electro magnetic signals although it doesnt send same signals from the location of lightning) is a device that detects lightning produced by thunderstorms. There are three primary types of detectors: ground-based systems using multiple antennas, mobile systems using a direction and a sense antenna in the same location (often aboard an aircraft), and space-based systems.

"Blitzortung.org" is a lightning detection network for locating electromagnetic discharges in the atmosphere (lightning discharges) with VLF receivers based on the time of arrival (TOA) and time of group arrival (TOGA) method. We are a community of station operators who send their data to the computing servers, programmers who develop and/or implement algorithms for locating and visualizing of sferic positions, and people who assist in any way to keep the system running. There is no restriction on membership. All people who keep the network in operation are volunteers. There are no fees, terms and conditions, and no contracts. If a station stops pooling its data, the server stops providing the access to the raw data for the user of that station.

Distance from station signal.php

Active Lightning Radar for SE Asia (courtesy of Blitzortung.org)