EL-Nino and La-Nina Monitoring

EL NIÑO / LA NIÑA

Latest of ionospheric total electron content

El-Nino / La-Nina forecast in CFS V2

Latest of ionospheric total electron content

Equatorial Sea Surface Temperature

Latest of ionospheric total electron content

Sea Surface in C

Latest of ionospheric total electron content

Global Sea Surface Anomalies in C

Latest of ionospheric total electron content

Sea Surface Anomalies in C

Latest of ionospheric total electron content

SST


What is El-Nino and La-Nina


El Nio (/?l 'ni?n.jo?/; Spanish: [el 'ni?o]) is the warm phase of the El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) and is associated with a band of warm ocean water that develops in the central and east-central equatorial Pacific (between approximately the International Date Line and 120W), including the area off the Pacific coast of South America. The ENSO is the cycle of warm and cold sea surface temperature (SST) of the tropical central and eastern Pacific Ocean. El Nio is accompanied by high air pressure in the western Pacific and low air pressure in the eastern Pacific. El Nio phases are known to occur close to four years, however, records demonstrate that the cycles have lasted between two and seven years. During the development of El Nio, rainfall develops between SeptemberNovember.[1] The cool phase of ENSO is La Nia, with SSTs in the eastern Pacific below average, and air pressure high in the eastern Pacific and low in the western Pacific. The ENSO cycle, including both El Nio and La Nia, causes global changes in temperature and rainfall.

La Nia (/l??'ni?nj?/, Spanish pronunciation: [la 'ni?a]) is a coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon that is the colder counterpart of El Nio, as part of the broader El NioSouthern Oscillation climate pattern. The name La Nia originates from Spanish, meaning "the little girl", analogous to El Nio meaning "the little boy". It has also in the past been called anti-El Nio,[1] and El Viejo (meaning "the old man").[2] During a period of La Nia, the sea surface temperature across the equatorial Eastern Central Pacific Ocean will be lower than normal by 3 to 5C (5.4 to 9F). An appearance of La Nia persists for at least five months. It has extensive effects on the weather across the globe, particularly in North America, even affecting the Atlantic and Pacific hurricane seasons.


Resource courtesy of: NOAA, iri.columbia.edu, Wikipedia, livescience.com